The Terai Arc Landscape Project (TAL) - Sustainable Livelihoods | WWF

The Terai Arc Landscape Project (TAL) - Sustainable Livelihoods



How to make a better living with lower impact on environment

A conservation plan will have a future only if the local people support it - and have a possibility for a good and sustainable life for themselves. Meet some of the people whose everyday life is part of creating a better future for wildlife and people in Terai.

 / ©: Simon de TREY-WHITE / WWF-UK
A man manufacturing round stool.
© Simon de TREY-WHITE / WWF-UK

Making money out of a forest without felling it

The climber cane (Calamus strictus) can be harvested sustainably in forests. Previously, locals used to sell the raw material to India, but the price was low. These local men now attend a workshop organized by TAL in Khata, learning to manufacture furniture. For each stool, the manufacturer will earn 5 times the price compared to what they could have get had they sold the raw material as before.

A useful medicinal plant variety

The members of Samjhana Community Forest User Group grow a medicinal plant that is not only sold but also considered an ideal crop for areas with lots of wildlife damage as animals don't eat them.

Manual water pumps

In arid areas, irrigation is one of the best gifts you can give to a farmer. The TAL project gives away water pumps to farmers that can be operated maunally by pedalling like a bicycle.

Young man pedalling a water pump. 
	© WWF / Helena Telkanranta
Young man pedalling a water pump.
© WWF / Helena Telkanranta
Sita Chaudhary, 36 years, is a member of Srijana

Women's Group. A year ago, she got a grant of 1,000 rupees (USD 14) from TAL to buy a piglet.

The piglet grew and gave birth to 7 piglets, bringing Chaudhary 7 times the return on investment - once they are old enough to be sold. With the money, Chaudhary is planning to install a biogas system at her home.

In a similar case, Desu Chaudhary, 23 years, and Sunita Chaudhary, 22 years, from Pitamber village in the buffer zone of Suklaphanta Wildlife Reserve, were desperate with a loan they could not pay back.

Then TAL project provided them with a 3 day training in piggery and a grant to buy one pig. Now that one pig has matured and given birth twice, resulting in a total of 20 piglets. The loan has been paid back, and the couple has been able to buy 2 oxen to plough their fields.

Sita Chaudhary with piglet. 
	© WWF / Helena Telkanranta
Sita Chaudhary with piglet.
© WWF / Helena Telkanranta