© © WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/Nabin Baral

Nepal Earthquake 2015 - Rapid Environmental Assessment

REA 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
REA
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
The Gorkha earthquake of 25 April 2015 and its aftershocks resulted in tragic loss of life, injury, and economic damage in Central and Western Regions of Nepal. WWF Nepal and the Hariyo Ban Program partnered with the Ministry of Science, Technology and Environment to undertake a rapid environmental assessment of the earthquake, which identified both direct environmental impacts, and environmental risks from recovery and reconstruction activities. This report outlines opportunities for many different sectors to ensure that building back is not only ‘better and safer’ but also greener, adopting environmentally responsible practices that promote healthy ecosystems for disaster risk reduction and natural resources for resilient development.

Nepal Earthquake 2015-Rapid Environmental Assessment

Nepal Earthquake 2015 - Building Back Better, Safer and Greener for a More Resilient Nepal

Strategy and Action Plan: 2015-2025 Terai Arc Landscape, Nepal

 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Strategy and Action Plan: 2015-2025 Terai Arc Landscape, Nepal
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
The Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) program was initiated in 2004. The first 10-year TAL Strategy and Implementation Plan (2004-2014) provided a touchstone to guide and address urgent conservation management issues and to tackle priority threats to make the TAL an ecologically functional landscape. This second strategy and action plan prepared by the Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation will continue to guide conservation in the TAL from 2015 to 2025 by addressing persisting and emerging threats to ensure socio-ecological integrity of the TAL over the next 10 years and beyond. Their preparation followed a participatory and consultative process, and included review of past experiences and achievements. They will build on past successes and take advantage of current opportunities.

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
The Eastern Himalayas are considered to be a region of global importance for biodiversity; the result of the synergistic interactions of the complex mountain terrain, extreme elevation gradients, overlaps of several biogeographic barriers, and regional monsoonal precipitation (Wikramanayake et al. 2001a). The distribution of the region’s biodiversity has been mapped as ecoregions directed along the horizontal axis of the mountain range (Wikramanayake et al. 2001b), and represent the ecological diversity from the Terai-duar grasslands and savannas at the base of the Himalayas to the alpine grasslands at the top, with the range of forest types in-between and along the steep altitudinal cline, from <300 m to> 4000 m. 

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash and Burn Agriculture

 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash-and-Burn Agriculture
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Degradation of forest through slash-and-burn agriculture by poor families with no alternative is common in parts of Nepal. This practice disrupts biological corridors and causes soil erosion and landslides. Planting broom grass was the answer to rehabilitating degraded forests, restoring ecological connectivity and improving the livelihoods of local communities in Tanahun district, Nepal. 

Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash and Burn Agriculture

An animal species and a sub species documented for the first time in Nepal

 
	© NTNC
© NTNC
Kathmandu, Nepal – One new species and one subspecies of mammal have been documented for the first time in Nepal.

The two new animals, namely Steppe polecat (Mustela evermanii) and Tibetan wolf, scientific name Canis lupus chanco (a sub-species of the grey wolf) were documented for the first time in Nepal in the Trans-Himalaya of Upper Mustang of the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA).

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The Last Yak Herder of Dhe

Improved Stoves, Forests and Lives

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Nabin Baral
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Nabin Baral
“You ask what the Improved Cooking Stoves have done for us? They have changed our lives, that’s what they have done,” says Bishnu Paudel, a resident of Dhikurpokhari VDC in Kaski district in north-central Nepal. This spirited woman is a member of the Bhakarjung Community Forest Users Group (CFUG), which has received support through the Hariyo Ban Program for the construction of Improved Cooking Stoves (ICSs).

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Radio programs

© Community Information Network
© Sunalo FM

Keyed to Conservation

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Jyoti Shrestha
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Jyoti Shrestha
“The first time I saw a computer, I was scared to touch a key. I thought it would burst apart,” says 28 year old Hira Singh, a trainee at the Computer Training Center in Mahadevpuri Community Forest Coordination Committee (CFCC) office, Banke district in the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL). Singh is one of the nine trainees enhancing their computer skills at the center.

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Disclaimer: The Hariyo Ban Program is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents of this website are the responsibility of WWF and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

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