| WWF


 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Nabin Baral

Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Climate change adaptation activities are being implemented in Nepal in line with the government's climate change policy, 201 0, National Adaptation Programme for Action (NAPA), 2011 and National Framework on Local Adaptation Plans for Action, 2011. Since 2012 the Hariyo Ban Program has been supporting local communities to prepare and implement community adaptation plans in more than 400 villages across 29 districts in two landscapes: Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL). The program also supported a climate sensitive protected area management plan for Manaslu Conservation Area. The adaptation planning process included vulnerability assessment of eco systems and human communities, identification and prioritization of adaptation measures, scenario planning, and implementation of adaptation activities.

Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool

The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
This briefing sheet presents lessons on the Hariyo Ban Program's work in Nepal on taking an integrated ecosystem and community approach to climate adaptation in Nepal. Major lessons focus on the value of integrating ecosystems in adaptation; the need to work at different scales and the challenges this poses; the importance of taking a multi-disciplinary approach; and the need to consider different time scales. The USAID-funded Hariyo Ban Program 1 is working with Government of Nepal and civil society on reducing threats to biodiversity and adverse impacts of climate change on human and ecological communities, in two high-value biodiversity landscapes: Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL), complemented by support to strengthen the enabling policy environment at the national level.

The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal

Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning: A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning: A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Climate change is affecting people and nature in Nepal, and impacts are increasing as climate change advances and there are more extreme weather events. Major effects to date include impacts on agriculture and livestock from unpredictable monsoons and other rains; increased scarcity of water supplies; and increased risk of floods and landslides. In the longer term, program studies and assessments suggest that there will be major changes to many of Nepal's forests, ecosystem processes and species, with consequent impacts for socio-economic systems.Climate vulnerabilities are often exacerbated by non-climate stresses to natural systems, including high subsistence use of forest products, encroachment,forest fire, infrastructure development, poaching, human-wildlife conflict, overgrazing, and invasive species. Underlying causes of these include poverty, increasing demand for land for development purposes, weak enforcement of existing policies, and poor governance.

Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning: A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, ... 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
The benefits of integrating disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) have been emphasized in the literature for year snow, and practitioners are increasingly realizing how important this is. Recently conceptual similarities and differences along with barriers and opportunities to integrate CCA and DRR have been discussed extensively. In 2011, when we started the Hariyo Ban Program (Green and Healthy Forest Program), we found linking these two approaches challenging in policy and practice. There was very little common under standing on the elements or a process for integration. The Government of Nepal had separate national frameworks for DRR and CCA, which were developed independently of one another by different ministries. However, as we worked at field level we saw a strong need for integration, realizing that the climate adaptation work we were doing was incomplete without DRR, and there were many opportunities to promote integration. This briefing sheet' presents our lessons in the first four and a half years of the
program.

Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation: Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Two massive earthquakes that hit Nepal on 25 April and 12 May, 2015 caused far-reaching social, economic and environmental damage. Thirty-one of the country’s 75 districts were affected leaving over 8,790 deaths and 22,300 people injured. A total of 498,852 houses were categorized as fully collapsed or damaged beyond repair and 256,697 partly damaged. The earthquakes triggered thousands of landslides that destroyed 2.2% of forest cover in six affected districts (National Planning Commission 2015). Material demand to rebuild half a million destroyed houses and other infrastructure will put much additional pressure on Nepal’s already stressed natural resources.

Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide

Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation along with conservation and sustainable management of forests in developing countries (REDD+) is emerging as an effective tool to mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change (Angelsen 2008; FAO 2011). The fourth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) estimated that the forest sector contributes 17.4% of all greenhouse gasses from human-caused sources; most of which is due to deforestation and forest degradation (IPCC 2007). Stern (2007) observed that curbing deforestation and forest degradation is a cost-effective way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape

Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Global climate change projections for Nepal and the Himalayas suggest signifi cant changes in temperature and precipitation, including increased monsoon (summer) precipitation and more variable and highly unpredictableactual rainfall patterns. The projections also suggest warmer winters and more frequent extreme weather events, with extended droughts between periods of intense rain. The assessment used the flowing forward approach to determine the impacts of climate change and to assess vulnerability of socio-ecological systems in the Terai Arc Landscape, Nepal (TAL). The approach examines the three components of vulnerability defi ned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity

Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
The Eastern Himalayas are considered to be a region of global importance for biodiversity; the result of the synergistic interactions of the complex mountain terrain, extreme elevation gradients, overlaps of several biogeographic barriers, and regional monsoonal precipitation (Wikramanayake et al. 2001a). The distribution of the region’s biodiversity has been mapped as ecoregions directed along the horizontal axis of the mountain range (Wikramanayake et al. 2001b), and represent the ecological diversity from the Terai-duar grasslands and savannas at the base of the Himalayas to the alpine grasslands at the top, with the range of forest types in-between and along the steep altitudinal cline, from <300 m to> 4000 m. 

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash and Burn Agriculture

 
	© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash-and-Burn Agriculture
© Hariyo Ban Program, WWF Nepal
Degradation of forest through slash-and-burn agriculture by poor families with no alternative is common in parts of Nepal. This practice disrupts biological corridors and causes soil erosion and landslides. Planting broom grass was the answer to rehabilitating degraded forests, restoring ecological connectivity and improving the livelihoods of local communities in Tanahun district, Nepal. 

Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash and Burn Agriculture

Keyed to Conservation

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Jyoti Shrestha
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Jyoti Shrestha
“The first time I saw a computer, I was scared to touch a key. I thought it would burst apart,” says 28 year old Hira Singh, a trainee at the Computer Training Center in Mahadevpuri Community Forest Coordination Committee (CFCC) office, Banke district in the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL). Singh is one of the nine trainees enhancing their computer skills at the center.

Read more...

An animal species and a sub species documented for the first time in Nepal

 
	© NTNC
© NTNC
Kathmandu, Nepal – One new species and one subspecies of mammal have been documented for the first time in Nepal.

The two new animals, namely Steppe polecat (Mustela evermanii) and Tibetan wolf, scientific name Canis lupus chanco (a sub-species of the grey wolf) were documented for the first time in Nepal in the Trans-Himalaya of Upper Mustang of the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA).

Read more....

The Last Yak Herder of Dhe

Improved Stoves, Forests and Lives

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Nabin Baral
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program/ Nabin Baral
“You ask what the Improved Cooking Stoves have done for us? They have changed our lives, that’s what they have done,” says Bishnu Paudel, a resident of Dhikurpokhari VDC in Kaski district in north-central Nepal. This spirited woman is a member of the Bhakarjung Community Forest Users Group (CFUG), which has received support through the Hariyo Ban Program for the construction of Improved Cooking Stoves (ICSs).

Read more...

Radio programs

© Community Information Network
© Sunalo FM

SELECTING CLIMATE RESILIENT TREE SPECIES FOR FOREST RESTORATION IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION OF NEPAL

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
SELECTING CLIMATE RESILIENT TREE SPECIES FOR FOREST RESTORATION IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION OF NEPAL
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Measurable species range shifts and changes in composition of forest vegetation in the Nepalese Himalaya have been already attributed to global climate change. This global driver of ecological change can act in synergy with proximate anthropogenic drivers to accelerate forest degradation. Because forests play an important role in providing vital ecological goods and services, including carbon sequestration, the Government of Nepal is encouraging forest restoration and sustainable management through various policy instruments including the recent Forest Policy, 2015. 

SELECTING CLIMATE RESILIENT TREE SPECIES FOR FOREST RESTORATION IN THE HIMALAYAN REGION OF NEPAL

Disclaimer: The Hariyo Ban Program is made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). The contents of this website are the responsibility of WWF and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

Download Brochures