Hariyo Ban Program Publications | WWF

Hariyo Ban Program Publications



सालक अनि सालकहरु

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
सालक अनि सालकहरु
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
“सालक अनि सालकहरु” सृजना संग्रह विद्यालयमा अध्ययनरत छात्रछात्राहरुद्वारा रचिएका कथा, लेख तथा चित्रहरुको संगालो हो । यी लेख रचनाहरु काठमाण्डौँ, भक्तपुर र ललितपुर जिल्लामा साना स्तनधारी प्राणी संरक्षण तथा अनुसन्धान फाउण्डेशनद्वारा तरोंगा फाउण्डेशन अस्ट्रेलियाको आर्थिक सहयोगमा सञ्‍चालित अन्तर विद्यालय कथा लेखन तथा चित्रकला प्रतियोगितामा सहभागी विद्यार्थीहरुबाट संकलन गरिएको हो तथा डब्लुडब्लुएफ नेपाल/हरियो वन कार्यक्रमको सहयोगमा किताबको रुपमा प्रकाशन गरिएको हो ।

सालक अनि सालकहरु

अलैँची

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
अलैँची खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
अलैँची खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

अलैँची खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

बेल

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
बेल खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
बेल खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

बेल खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

चिराइतो

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
चिराइतो खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
चिराइतो खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

चिराइतो खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

कफी

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
कफी खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
कफी खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

कफी खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

कागती

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
कागती खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
कागती खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

कागती खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

चिया

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
चिया खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
चिया खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

चिया खेती सम्बन्धी जानकारी पुस्तिका

Rapid Evaluation Report of Hariyo Ban Program’s Green Recovery and Reconstruction Work

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Rapid Evaluation Report of Hariyo Ban Program’s Green Recovery and Reconstruction Work
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
After the 2015 earthquake the Hariyo Ban Program undertook green recovery and reconstruction (GRR) activities at central level and in four seriously affected districts. This evaluation looked at the effectiveness of interventions. With a few exceptions, field activities were found to be effective in terms of timely planning of activities for recovery, building partnerships with other development partners, bringing benefits to affected populations including needy and socio-economically vulnerable households, and reducing pressure on forests and natural resources. Central level interventions including GRR training and outreach were largely successful in reaching target audiences across several sectors, and establishing soil bioengineering demonstration sites. Challenges were encountered in managing beneficiary expectations; ensuring activities met beneficiaries’ immediate needs; implementing cash-for-work activities; doing outreach to communities on GRR; and ensuring sustainability of interventions after the Hariyo Ban recovery funding ended. Recommendations cover strategic planning; quality assurance; technology transfer; cash-for-work; livelihood grants; GRR integration in disaster planning; and sustainability of program-supported activities.

Rapid Evaluation Report of Hariyo Ban Program’s Green Recovery and Reconstruction Work

Biodiversity, People and Climate Change - Final Technical Report of the Hariyo Ban Program, First Phase

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Biodiversity, People and Climate Change - Final Technical Report of the Hariyo Ban Program, First Phase
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
The Hariyo Ban Program, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), is implemented by a consortium of four partners: World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE), National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), and the Federation of Community Forest Users Nepal (FECOFUN). This report covers the first phase of the Program which ran from August 2011 to December 2016 and aimed to reduce adverse impacts of climate change and threats to biodiversity in Nepal. Phase I had three core interwoven components – biodiversity conservation, sustainable landscapes and climate change adaptation, with livelihoods, governance, and gender equality and social inclusion (GESI) as cross cutting themes. It operated in two landscapes: the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan Annapurna Landscape (CHAL). It works closely with a wide range of stakeholders and beneficiaries at different levels including Government; local communities and community based organizations; non-government organizations (NGOs); academia; other projects; and the private sector. During the first phase of Hariyo Ban, CHAL (covering the Gandaki river basin) was formally recognized by the Government of Nepal (GoN) as a new landscape in the country and prioritized for conservation. Hariyo Ban supported the Ministry of Forests and Soil Conservation (MoFSC) to prepare a Strategy and Action Plan for the landscape taking a river basin approach. It also supported the preparation of the next TAL ten-year Strategy and Action Plan. Together these landscapes cover over five million hectares of biodiverse area. Both Strategies mainstream climate adaptation. They now guide Hariyo Ban’s work as it collaborates with GoN, communities and other stakeholders to help implement them, with a major focus on protected areas, corridors, biodiversity important areas, critical subwatersheds, and areas with high climate vulnerability.

A Study on Promoting Community Managed Ecotourism in CHAL and TAL

 
	© Nepal Economic Forum
A Study on Promoting Community Managed Ecotourism in CHAL and TAL
© Nepal Economic Forum
The tourism industry of Nepal is focused on two major motivations:namely the Himalayas and the rich cultural heritage of the Kathmandu Valley. Because of this narrow focus, tourism has been centered primarily in Kathmandu and the cities, such as Pokhara and Chitwan. Even though Nepal boasts of unique biodiversity across the nation, it has not been able to package it in a way that derives benefits from tourism. One of the major reasons for this has been the low benefit margins compared to the high risk of developing such tourism packages.

A Study on Promoting Community Managed Ecotourism in CHAL and TAL

Preparing for Change - Climate Vulnerability Assessment of the CHAL

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Preparing for Change - Climate Vulnerability Assessment of the CHAL
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
The Himalayas are expected to experience many changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change. Climate projections for Nepal suggest that monsoon (summer) precipitation will increase, especially in eastern and central Nepal, but actual rainfall patterns will be highly variable, both spatially and temporally. Extreme weather events are expected to become more frequent, with extended droughts interspersed between periods of intense precipitation. Winters are predicted to become warmer.

The Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) spans the geographically and biologically diverse Gandaki River basin in the central Nepal, extending from the tropical lowlands in Chitwan National Park (CNP) to the cold, high-altitude semi-desert of the Trans-Himalayan Region (THR) and the peaks of Annapurna, Manaslu and western Langtang. With an altitudinal range of nearly 8,000 m, highly dissected terrain, and complex seasonality, the landscape has a wide array of climates and microclimates that shape the habitats and environmental conditions for its rich biodiversity and ecosystem services. These support a human population of over 4.5 million and diverse economic activities. The ecological, socio-cultural and economic systems in the landscape are closely intertwined, with people’s livelihoods dependent on sustained ecological integrity.

Preparing for Change - Climate Vulnerability Assessment of the CHAL

Assessment of Poaching and Illegal Wildlife Trafficking in Banke-Kamdi Complex

 
	© WWF, Hariyo Ban Program
Assessment of Poaching and Illegal Wildlife Trafficking in Banke-Kamdi Complex
© WWF, Hariyo Ban Program
Wildlife crime is a serious issue in conservation particularly of the threatened species of wild flora and fauna globally. Several endangered species such as Asian big cats, elephants and rhinoceros are at the verge of extinction if the current trend of wildlife crime is not retarded. The illegal wildlife trade is among the leading causes for rapid wildlife species decline worldwide (McMurray, 2008). Similarly, Nepal cannot be exception to this situation; the country has been known as transit for illegal wildlife trade and a source for some of the illegally traded species such as rhino horns, tiger and leopard pelts and pangolin scales. Despite various efforts to control wildlife crime, such crime still exists sporadically and in low volume in the country.

Assessment of Poaching and Illegal Wildlife Trafficking in Banke-Kamdi Complex

मानव–वन्यजन्तु द्वन्द्व व्यवस्थापन सन्दर्भ सामाग्री्रीहरु २०७४

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
मानव–वन्यजन्तु द्वन्द्व र क्षति न्यूूिनिकरणका उपायहरु
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
मानव–वन्यजन्तु द्वन्द्व व्यवस्थापन सन्दर्भ सामाग्री्रीहरु २०७४

मानव–वन्यजन्तु द्वन्द्व व्यवस्थापन सन्दर्भ सामाग्री्रीहरु २०७४

Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Hariyo Ban Program Consortium

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Hariyo Ban Program Consortium
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
An assessment of the Hariyo Ban consortium was conducted to explore how effective the consortium is in taking a multi-disciplinary approach, what factors govern successes and limitations, and how to distill this important learning.

Assessment of the Effectiveness of the Hariyo Ban Program Consortium

The Value of a River Basin Approach in Climate Adaptation

Climate  change is  having major  impacts on  water resources, affecting  the quantity, quality and timing of waterflowsin  many  places. These changes are likely to increase as climate change advances. Taking a holistic river basin approach to climate adaptation can bringmany advantages whenbuildingresilience in natural and  human  systemsand addressing conflicts  that  will increasingly arise as climate change advances. This paper reviews the advantages and challenges of such an approach, drawing on resultsof a vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning for the  Gandaki river basin in Nepal using WWF’s ‘Flowing Forward’ methodology for assessing vulnerability of different human and environmental systems. The  paper reviews  how the river basin approach frames  key  adaptation  issues and challenges, such  asmaintaining, provisioning,and  regulating  ecosystem  services;reconciling upstream  and  downstream needs for  water  and ecosystem servicesby various sectors; and maintaining ecological connectivity in order to promote adaptation of freshwater and terrestrial systems and species. Results can be applied in adaptation planning at various levels,including for local communities. The paperalsoreviews interactions between climate change and development, including   changes   in   land   use, hydropower developmentand  water  extraction, and  examines the value  of  environmental  flow  analysisto understand  likely  combined  impacts. Finally,it  outlines  the  importance  of  multi-sectoral  and multi-scale adaptation approachesin river basins, including the need for appropriate institutional structuresand policy frameworks.

The Value of a River Basin Approach in Climate Adaptation

BUILDING BACK SAFER AND GREENER - A Guide to Sound Environmental Practices for Disaster Recovery in Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
BUILDING BACK SAFER AND GREENER - A Guide to Sound Environmental Practices for Disaster Recovery in Nepal
© WWF Nepal, Hariyo Ban Program
Post-disaster recovery and reconstruction can cause many adverse environmental impacts. This guide outlines ways in which they can be avoided, and good practices can be promoted, in order to reduce future disaster risk and ensure long-term livelihoods and well-being for local people. The guide covers settlements and land use planning; building construction; waste management; energy; infrastructure; water, sanitation and hygiene; agriculture and livelihoods; and education. It highlights flood risk management, landslide prevention and treatment, and management of forests after disasters, with climate change, and gender equality and social inclusion as cross-cutting themes. The guide is written for government and non-government organization staff working in development, humanitarian and environmental fields; policy makers; the private sector; academics; and donor agency staff.

BUILDING BACK SAFER AND GREENER - A Guide to Sound Environmental Practices for Disaster Recovery in Nepal

Internal Governance Tool 1 Public Hearing and Public Auditing

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Internal Governance Tool 1 Public Hearing and Public Auditing
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Public Hearing and Public Auditing (PHPA) is a participatory process that aims to strengthen the transparency and accountability of institutions. The process is carried out by Forest User Groups with the assistance of local resource persons acting as facilitators. Through information sharing and question-answer style discussion, it allows for a mutual assessment of performance by user group members (the rights holders) and user group executive committee members (the duty bearers). While management processes and outcomes are assessed during the public hearing, the public audit reviews financial transactions, including the status of the group fund. Both processes are generally conducted annually. Process participants agree on a set of recommendations which are reviewed in the following public hearing and auditing.

Internal Governance Tool 1 Public Hearing and Public Auditing

Internal Governance Tool 2 Participatory Well-Being Ranking

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Internal Governance Tool 2 Participatory Well-Being Ranking
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Participatory Well-Being Ranking is a process by which a group of households are asked to rank themselves according to economic and social status. The process is conducted by Forest Users Groups with the assistance of local resource persons acting as facilitators. Households are generally described as either well-off, middle income, or poor, although some households may be described as extremely poor. Following the ranking exercise, and based on the resources available to the Forest User Group, livelihood support initiatives are identified and implemented to support poor and extremely poor households. This tool directly supports the provision in the Community Forestry Development Guidelines 2009 earmarking 35% of total group funds for pro-poor livelihood support activities.

Internal Governance Tool 2 Participatory Well-Being Ranking

Internal Governance Tool 3 Participatory Governance Assessment

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Internal Governance Tool 3 Participatory Governance Assessment
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The Participatory Governance Assessment tool is used to assess good governance practices in community groups. A group of selected participants evaluates the extent to which the decision making and management practices in a community group comply with the four ‘pillars’ of good governance: transparency, participation, accountability and predictability. The assessment is guided by a set of sixteen governance indicators which participants rate as very good, good, moderate or poor. Responses are recorded on a matrix and later presented visually as a spider-web diagram. Finally, a Governance Improvement Plan is formulated. In addition to ensuring that monitoring and evaluation processes are participatory, use of this tool can help to improve the overall functioning of a community group and its ability to manage natural resources in an equitable and sustainable manner.

Internal Governance Tool 3 Participatory Governance Assessment

Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Planning

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Planning
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
This manual is designed to align with the guidelines and tools recommended for the Training of Trainers on climate change, vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning. Cross-cutting issues like livelihoods, gender equality and social inclusion, and governance have been given due importance in this training manual. This manual provides a step-by-step guide for the people engaged in local development, and adaptation planning.

Vulnerability Assessment and Adaptation Planning

Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The manual seeks to present a best-case scenario, while also realizing that every situation is different and complex in its own way, very often requiring difficult decision-making on the part of the practitioner as to whether one should invest in longer-term, more comprehensive sub-basin or basin-oriented interventions or if one should instead implement more immediate short-term life or property saving interventions. This question is, unfortunately, often partially answered by  limitations  of  budget,  donor  priorities,  limitations  of  local  or  national  government  and  capacity  of  the  implementing  organization, as well as 'moral' priorities of immediate need. However, the practitioner must be aware of that tradeoff between the short-term and the long-term and answer her/his own questions honestly, transparently and together with the community at risk.

Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas

Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Climate change adaptation activities are being implemented in Nepal in line with the government's climate change policy, 201 0, National Adaptation Programme for Action (NAPA), 2011 and National Framework on Local Adaptation Plans for Action, 2011. Since 2012 the Hariyo Ban Program has been supporting local communities to prepare and implement community adaptation plans in more than 400 villages across 29 districts in two landscapes: Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL). The program also supported a climate sensitive protected area management plan for Manaslu Conservation Area.

Climate Adaptation Plan Health Check-up Tool

PEOPLE AND FORESTS - Livelihoods and Governance Results from the Hariyo Ban Program Phase I

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
PEOPLE AND FORESTS - Livelihoods and Governance Results from the Hariyo Ban Program Phase I
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The goal of this consultancy was to undertake a rapid assessment of the effectiveness of Hariyo Ban’s livelihood and governance activities in improving the economic wellbeing of forest-dependent people, improving participatory forest management, and reducing unsustainable pressure on biodiversity. Specific objectives were:
1. To assess the effectiveness of the Hariyo Ban livelihood approaches in improving livelihoods of community members
2. To assess linkages between the Hariyo Ban livelihood approaches and changes in forest and biodiversity condition resulting from behavior change through livelihoods
3. To assess the effectiveness of Hariyo Ban’s governance work in promoting more equitable benefit sharing and participation in forest management by women, poor, vulnerable and marginalized groups
4. To assess the effectiveness of Hariyo Ban’s governance work in improving forest and biodiversity condition through forest management
5. To provide recommendations to improve the effectiveness of livelihoods and governance work for the benefit of the human beneficiaries and for forests and biodiversity

PEOPLE AND FORESTS - Livelihoods and Governance Results from the Hariyo Ban Program Phase I

Training Manual for Bioengineering for River Training and Slope Protection Works: Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Training Manual for Bioengineering for River Training and Slope Protection Works: Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Bioengineering is not a new concept for Nepal. It has been applied to roadside slope stabilization and also practiced by farmers. In recent times, bioengineering has been extensively used to control erosion and reduce shallow seated instabilities on slopes. Most roads related bioengineering is carried out by Road Projects. Mercy Corps Nepal is also extensively using bioengineering for riverbank erosion control and hill slope stabilization. As a result, there is a need for engineers with a sound understanding and knowledge of bioengineering.

Training Manual for Bioengineering for River Training and Slope Protection Works Training Course for Field Technicians Working in Disaster Reduction Project Areas

Hariyo Ban Program - Second Phase Brochure

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Hariyo Ban Program - Second Phase Brochure
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The program finds its inspiration from the popular saying ‘Hariyo Ban Nepal Ko Dhan’ (Healthy green forests are the wealth of Nepal) which emphasizes the links between people and forests. The first phase of the Hariyo Ban Program was launched in August 2011 and concluded in December 2016; it  aimed to reduce adverse impacts of climate change and threats to biodiversity in NepalSignificant progress was made in achieving the Program goal.

The second phase of the Program started in July 2016 and will run for another five years. It builds on the accomplishments and learning of the first phase in addressing biodiversity threats and climate vulnerability. The goal of the new phase is to increase ecological and community resilience in biodiverse landscapes - Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) and the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL).  This goal will be achieved through two objectives (a) improving conservation and management of TAL and CHAL landscapes; and (b) reducing climate change vulnerability in the landscapes.

Hariyo Ban Program - Second Phase Brochure

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Environmental Considerations

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Environmental Considerations
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
When working on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) projects after disasters it is important to consider the environment throughout the project cycle. Projects with good environmental planning and management help reduce short-term risks to those affected by the disaster, as well as supporting disaster risk reduction and reducing exposure to natural hazards in the future, and hence decreasing household and community vulnerability. 

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Environmental Considerations

Post-disaster Shelter and Housing

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Post-disaster Shelter and Housing
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
When planning, designing, and implementing shelter and housing reconstruction programs, it is important for shelter and construction agencies to consider the environment throughout the program cycle for relief, recovery and reconstruction. This includes site selection, material selection and procurement, and reconstruction practices undertaken by agencies, communities, households and contractors. To support environmental integration, training and awareness raising are needed, along with practical demonstrations of good practices.

Post-disaster Shelter and Housing

Nepal Education Cluster

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The earthquakes in April and May of 2015 have had a devastating impact on the facilities and infrastructure in the education sector. Structural Assessment data indicates that in the 11 affected districts outside Kathmandu valley, 67% of classrooms (32,000) are unsafe for use. As a result, a large-scale education in emergencies response is under way, providing temporary classrooms, emergency learning supplies and teacher training on psycho-social support and life saving messages to 14 of the most affected districts.
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The earthquakes in April and May of 2015 have had a devastating impact on the facilities and infrastructure in the education sector. Structural Assessment data indicates that in the 11 affected districts outside Kathmandu valley, 67% of classrooms (32,000) are unsafe for use. As a result, a large-scale education in emergencies response is under way, providing temporary classrooms, emergency learning supplies and teacher training on psychosocial support and life saving messages to 14 of the most affected districts.

Nepal Education Cluster

Building Back Better, Safer and Greener for a More Resilient Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Building Back Better, Safer and Greener for a More Resilient Nepal
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The Nepal earthquake in April 2015 and its after shocks resulted in huge loss of life, injury, and economic damage. The estimated value of damage and loss was US$7 billion, a large proportion of it housing. Other sectors that require significant reconstruction include agriculture, education, roads, energy, tourism, industry, water and sanitation, and forestry. A rapid environmental assessment of the earthquake  identified direct impacts, and also many potential risks to the environment from reconstruction. At the same time there is a great opportunity to build back not only ‘better and safer’ but also greener, ensuring healthy ecosystems for disaster risk reduction and natural resources for resilient livelihoods and economic development.

Building Back Better, Safer and Greener for a More Resilient Nepal

फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्ड- व्यवस्थापन समितिको संचालन कार्यविधि, २०७२

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्ड- व्यवस्थापन समितिको संचालन कार्यविधि, २०७२
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा जलाधार क्षेत्रको दिगो संरक्षण गर्ने कार्यहरुमा सहयोग गर्न गठित फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्डलाई छिटो छरितो ढंगले व्यवस्थापन समितिमार्फत योजना तर्जुमा, अभिलेख व्यवस्थापन र दैनिक कार्य संचालनमा सहयोग गर्न आवश्यक भएकोले, उक्त व्यवस्थापन समितिको सञ्‍चालन कार्यविधि फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्डले आन्तरिक रुपमा छलफल गरी तयार गरेको छ । 

फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्ड- व्यवस्थापन समितिको संचालन कार्यविधि, २०७२

पारिस्थितिकीय सेवा भूक्तानी प्रणाली अन्तर्गत ग्रिन स्टिकर सञ्चालन कार्यविधि, २०७२

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
पारिस्थितिकीय सेवा भूक्तानी प्रणाली अन्तर्गत ग्रिन स्टिकर सञ्चालन कार्यविधि, २०७२
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
पर्यटन व्यवसायमा वातावरण संरक्षण महत्वपूर्ण पक्ष हो । तसर्थ, वातावरणमैत्री व्यवसायलाई प्रोत्साहित र पुरस्कृत गर्नु पर्ने आवश्यकता रहेको छ । पर्यटन व्यवसायीहरुलाई निश्चित मापदण्डको आधारमा ग्रिन स्टीकरप्रदान गरी सो वापत प्राप्त रकम तथा वातावरणमैत्री क्रियाकलापले पारिस्थितिकीय पद्वतिमा पर्ने वा परिरहेका नकरात्मक असरहरुलाई रोक्ने उपायहरु अंगीकार गर्न तथा वातावरण संरक्षणको क्षेत्रमा योगदान एवं पारिस्थितिकीय सेवा प्रापक र सेवा प्रदायक बीचको सम्बन्धलाई सुमधुर बनाउने हेतुले यो अवधारण ल्याइएको हो ।

पारिस्थितिकीय सेवा भूक्तानी प्रणाली अन्तर्गत ग्रिन स्टिकर सञ्चालन कार्यविधि, २०७२

फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट- कोष व्यवस्थापन कार्यविधि, २०७२

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट- कोष व्यवस्थापन कार्यविधि, २०७२
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा जलाधार क्षेत्रमा रहेका प्राकृतिक स्रोतहरुको दिगो व्यस्थापन गर्न, वातावरणमैत्री भौतिक पूर्वाधारहरुको विकासमा सहयोग गर्न, माथिल्लो तटीय क्षेत्रमा बसोबास गर्ने स्थानीय बासिन्दाहरुको सामाजिक तथा आर्थिक विकासमा योगदान गर्न र फेवाताल क्षेत्रको निरन्तर संरक्षण गर्न, सम्बन्धित क्षेत्रका घरपरिवारहरु तथा त्यस क्षेत्रमा कार्यरत संघ÷संस्थाहरुलाई बोर्डबाट आर्थिक सहायता उपलब्ध गराई उनीहरुको सहभागिता र योगदानलाई प्रभावकारी बनाउन वाञ्छनीय भएकोले, फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिस्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्डले आन्तरिक छलफल गरी आफ्नो कार्यविधिको दफा २२ को प्रावधान अनुरुप यो कार्यविधि बनाएको छ । 

फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट- कोष व्यवस्थापन कार्यविधि, २०७२

फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्ड- कार्यान्वयन समितिको संचालन कार्यविधि, २०७२

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्ड- कार्यान्वयन समितिको संचालन कार्यविधि, २०७२
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
फेवा जलाधार क्षेत्रको दिगो संरक्षण गर्ने कार्यहरुमा सहयोग गर्न गठित फेवा वाटरसेड इकोसिष्टम म्यानेजमेण्ट बोर्डले तयार गरेको वार्षिक योजना तथा उक्त योजना अनुरुप व्यवस्थापन समितिमार्फत तयार भएका कार्यक्रमहरुको छिटो छरितो ढंगले कार्यान्वयनमा सहयोग गर्न आवश्यक भएकोले कार्यान्वयन समिति गठन भएको छ । 

Guideline for Field Monitoring

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Guideline for Field Monitoring
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Guideline for Field Monitoring

Guideline for Field Monitoring

Hariyo Ban Program Phase I Achievements and Learning

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Hariyo Ban Program Phase I Achievements and Learning
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
This factsheet outlines the achievements and learning of the Hariyo Ban Program during its first five years. The Program is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and is implemented by four core partners: World Wildlife Fund (WWF), Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE), National Trust for Nature Conservation (NTNC), and the Federation of Community Forestry Users, Nepal (FECOFUN). It works closely with a range of stakeholders and beneficiaries including Government; local communities and community-based organizations; non-government organizations (NGOs); academia; other projects; and private sector.

Hariyo Ban Program Phase I Achievements and Learning

Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
This study, ‘Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) for REDD+ Readiness Activities’ presents the comprehensive baseline of forest carbon stock in CHAL with a detailed assessment of carbon sequestration potential, carbon-capture, permanency, leakage, and risks from the forest coverage. 

Forest Carbon Assessment in Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

Pangolin

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Pangolin
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Among the four species of Asian Pangolin, two species Chinese Pangolin Manis pentdactyla and Indian Pangolin Manis crassicaudataare found in Nepal.

Know more on morphology and structure, distribution, population and habitat, feeding behavior, reproduction and life cycle, social behavior, threats and conservation measures, conservation and legal status and key facts on Pangolin.

Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Global climate change projections for Nepal and the Himalayas suggest signifi cant changes in temperature and precipitation, including increased monsoon (summer) precipitation and more variable and highly unpredictableactual rainfall patterns. The projections also suggest warmer winters and more frequent extreme weather events, with extended droughts between periods of intense rain. The assessment used the flowing forward approach to determine the impacts of climate change and to assess vulnerability of socio-ecological systems in the Terai Arc Landscape, Nepal (TAL). The approach examines the three components of vulnerability defi ned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity

Realigning Priorities - Climate Vulnerability Assessment - Terai Arc Landscape

Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Integrating Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation Lessons from Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The Eastern Himalayas are considered to be a region of global importance for biodiversity; the result of the synergistic interactions of the complex mountain terrain, extreme elevation gradients, overlaps of several biogeographic barriers, and regional monsoonal precipitation (Wikramanayake et al. 2001a). The distribution of the region’s biodiversity has been mapped as ecoregions directed along the horizontal axis of the mountain range (Wikramanayake et al. 2001b), and represent the ecological diversity from the Terai-duar grasslands and savannas at the base of the Himalayas to the alpine grasslands at the top, with the range of forest types in-between and along the steep altitudinal cline, from <300 m to> 4000 m.

Climate-change Impacts on the Biodiversity of the Terai Arc Landscape and the Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape

The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
This briefing sheet presents lessons on the Hariyo Ban Program's work in Nepal on taking an integrated ecosystem and community approach to climate adaptation in Nepal. Major lessons focus on the value of integrating ecosystems in adaptation; the need to work at different scales and the challenges this poses; the importance of taking a multi-disciplinary approach; and the need to consider different time scales. The USAID-funded Hariyo Ban Program 1 is working with Government of Nepal and civil society on reducing threats to biodiversity and adverse impacts of climate change on human and ecological communities, in two high-value biodiversity landscapes: Terai Arc Landscape (TAL) and Chitwan-Annapurna Landscape (CHAL), complemented by support to strengthen the enabling policy environment at the national level.

The Benefits and Challenges of Integrating an Ecosystem Approach in Community Climate Adaptation in Two Landscapes in Nepal

Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning: A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Climate change is affecting people and nature in Nepal, and impacts are increasing as climate change advances and there are more extreme weather events. Major effects to date include impacts on agriculture and livestock from unpredictablemonsoons and other rains; increased scarcity of water supplies; and increased risk of floods and landslides. In the longer term, program studies and assessments suggest that there will be major changes to many of Nepal's forests, ecosystemprocesses and species, with consequent impacts for socio-economic systems.Climate vulnerabilities are often exacerbated by non-climate stresses to natural systems, including high subsistence use of forest products, encroachment,forest fire, infrastructure development, poaching, human-wildlife conflict, overgrazing, and invasive species. Underlying causes of these include poverty, increasing demand for land for development purposes, weak enforcement of existingpolicies, and poor governance.

Mainstreaming Climate Adaptation in Local Development Planning: A Reflection from the Hariyo Ban Program, Nepal

Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Two massive earthquakes that hit Nepal on 25 April and 12 May, 2015 caused far-reaching social, economic and environmental damage. Thirty-one of the country’s 75 districts were affected leaving over 8,790 deaths and 22,300 people injured. A total of 498,852 houses were categorized as fully collapsed or damaged beyond repair and 256,697 partly damaged. The earthquakes triggered thousands of landslides that destroyed 2.2% of forest cover in six affected districts (National Planning Commission 2015). Material demand to rebuild half a million destroyed houses and other infrastructure will put much additional pressure on Nepal’s already stressed natural resources.

Building Material Selection and Use - An Environmental Guide

सुन्दर सफलता- समुदाय र जैविक विविधताका हरित परिवर्तनका कथाहरु भाग २

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
सुन्दर सफलता- समुदाय र जैविक विविधताका हरित परिवर्तनका कथाहरु भाग २
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
यस सङ्ग्रहमा सम्मिलित कथा हामीले वातावरण र व्यक्तिहरुको जीवनमा परिवर्तन ल्याउनका लागि गरेको सहयोगका एक झल्को हुन् । यी कथा हरियो वन कार्यक्रमका तीन मुख्य सम्भाग तथा तीन अन्र्तसम्बन्धित मुद्दाबाट लिइएका हुन् । यिनले जैविक विविधतालाई जोगाउन, जलवायु परिवर्तनसँग आफुलाई अनुकूलित तुल्याउन र पछिसम्मका लागि प्राकृतिक स्रोत र सेवालाई व्यवस्थित रुपले समायोजन गर्न अघि बढीरहेको समुदायको उदाहरण दिन्छन् ।

सुन्दर सफलता- समुदाय र जैविक विविधताका हरित परिवर्तनका कथाहरु भाग २

Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash-and-Burn Agriculture

 
	© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
Broom Grass: Rehabilitation of Forests Degraded by Shifting Cultivation/Slash-and-Burn Agriculture
© WWF Nepal/Hariyo Ban Program
In general shifting cultivation/slash and burn agriculture is a traditional circulatory practice whereby trees, shrubs and bushes on steep hillsides are slashed and burnt to clean the land for agricultural purposes. After cleaning the steep hillsides various  kinds of lentils, oil producing plants, and cash crops such as Maas, Gahat, Teel, Junelo, Makai (maize), Ghaiya Dhaan (upland rice), Kodo (millet), Kaunu, and Sama are planted. After planting such crops for a year or two, the land is left as it is for two to five years during which time another hillside is chosen to slash and burn and practice shifting cultivation. The land where crops had been planted initially is left as it is to allow shrubs, bushes and trees to grow back. It has been found that in such places where bushes and shrubs are allowed to regrow, the hill side is overtaken with the Banmaara plant (Lantana camera, Eupatorium adenophorum and Chromolaena adorata) which do not allow other plant species to grow in the same place. After a few years slash and burn is repeated here and shifting agriculture practiced.