Wildlife | WWF

Wildlife



Over the next five years WWF Nepal, in collaboration with GoN, will continue to manage and monitor populations of the priority species namely Bengal tiger, Greater One-horned rhinoceros, Asian elephant, snow leopard, and Gangetic river dolphin. WWF Nepal will also pay attention to other species of special concern; notably the Gharial crocodile, swamp deer, black buck, red panda, argali sheep and musk deer. 

Since ecosystems are dynamic, habitat management is essential to provide suitable and adequate habitat for focal species. For example, in the TAL protected areas, the grassland habitats, essential to species such as rhinos, tigers and Bengal Florican are being replaced by forests.

Without management, these habitats will be lost, affecting the populations of the endangered species. WWF will support habitat management in protected areas, and site-specific habitat management inside and outside the protected areas for the focal species. However, habitat management will be conducted only on the basis of scientifically developed management plans.

WWF Nepal will strengthen its efforts on wildlife crime control to effectively control poaching in the two priority landscapes and beyond. WWF will work at all levels; from engaging communities to enhancing trans-boundary coordination, strengthening law enforcement agencies to reformation of policies. Tackling human wildlife conflict remains another priority, with an emphasis on both preventative and remedial measures.

 
	© WWF Nepal
Setting up of camera traps is a tool in species monitoring. Here, two citizen scientists are working on setting up a camera trap to help in Snow Leopard monitoring
© WWF Nepal
 
	© WWF Nepal
Nepal, a treasure trove of Biodiversity.
© WWF Nepal

GOAL: By 2016, the population of priority species and species of special concern increased and managed as meta-populations in the two priority landscapes of the WWF Priority Place, Eastern Himalayas, and other national conservation priority areas.