Wildlife | WWF

Wildlife



WWF Nepal has worked with the Government of Nepal for over five decades, helping secure significant victories in wildlife conservation. Bringing back one-horned rhinoceros from the brink of extinction and achieving its zero poaching is one such work, Nepal has set an example globally. Yet, the country’s wildlife still faces a multitude of challenges arising from habitat loss, poaching and human-wildlife conflict.

Accordingly, WWF Nepal continues on its mission to increase and manage populations of priority species, restore lost wildlife populations in their former range, improve and expand habitats, mitigate human-wildlife conflicts (HWC) and eliminate poaching and illegal wildlife trade transits in Nepal.

In the next five years, WWF Nepal will seek and mobilise resources to manage protected areas, protect, manage and/or restore critical habitats, provide corridors and connectivity between habitats by integrating smart green infrastructures, as required. Sustainable financing mechanisms will be set up to secure and manage global priority species and benefit local communities. Poaching and illegal wildlife trade will be controlled by strengthening law enforcement agencies and local communities, while securing national, regional and international support. Similarly, safe HWC strategies will be designed and implemented to sustain community stewardship in wildlife conservation.

The outcome of our investment will directly contribute to the global goal of doubling tiger population, reaching historical rhino population, maintaining snow leopard population and eliminating poaching and illegal wildlife trade, and effectively managing human wildlife conflict.  

 
	© WWF Nepal
Setting up of camera traps is a tool in species monitoring. Here, two citizen scientists are working on setting up a camera trap to help in Snow Leopard monitoring
© WWF Nepal
 
	© WWF Nepal
Nepal, a treasure trove of Biodiversity.
© WWF Nepal
 

GOAL: BY 2021, NEPAL’S MOST THREATENED AND ECOLOGICALLY, ECONOMICALLY AND CULTURALLY  IMPORTANT SPECIES ARE SECURED IN THE WILD.